The Agony Column

Interview: William Gibson Connects ‘The Peripheral’

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Author William Gibson

Author William Gibson

Readers are advised not to read the dust jacket, which gives away a big part of the story, as do many reviews.. This is a novel best experienced on its own, immersive terms. Gibson has proven that he’s a writer we can trust and that pays off here in so many ways. Plunging us into a vision of crime and caper complicated by an intricately devised future, ‘The Peripheral’ is perhaps Gibson’s best novel yet.

One the most enjoyable aspects of ‘The Peripheral’ is Gibson’s bone-dry sense of humor. This is a very funny book, with nary a laugh line in sight. Gibson’s smart use of the crime genre and science fiction genre give him the perfect excuse to zip up and down the income scale in a manner that speaks intimately to the income gap permeating our lives that nonetheless is somehow unspeakable.

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All that is readily apparent in our world starts out invisible in ‘The Peripheral.’ By the time the novel ends, we can look back, and sense our own history, remade and re-mystified. Gibson paints a portrait of the future that highlights the weirdness of the present. He writes superbly about technology; how it changes us as we change it. But he needs no tech to re-wire our minds. Words will do just fine.

Author Azar Nafisi and Actor Cary Elwes

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Azar Nafisi

Azar Nafisi discusses her book The Republic of Imagination.

And then actor Cary Elwes talks about the making of the movie The Princess Bride and his book As You Wish. Elwes’ portrait of the production adds another Escher-like layer to the proceedings.

Cary Elwes

Cary Elwes

Maureen Corrigan and the Power of Re-Reading

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Maureen Corrigan. Photo: Nina Subin

Maureen Corrigan. Photo: Nina Subin

There’s an important implicit assumption at the heart of Maureen Corrigan’s So We Read On: How The Great Gatsby Came to Be and Why It Endures. It is presumed that readers of her book have read F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby sometime in the past, and probably not too recently. The title and the book invite us to re-read Fitzgerald, and I’m going to suggest that readers follow my cue, and (re-)read Fitzgerald before reading Corrigan’s work.

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Lisa See “China Dolls” and Lawrence Wright “13 Days in September”

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On this week’s Agony Column, the legendary Walter Mosely on his latest story whose protagonist is a former porn star. And Lisa See, the renowned author of novels and nonfiction centering on the lives of Chinese and Chinese American characters discusses her new novel about performers in San Francisco’s night clubs in the middle of the last century.

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Lisa See’s books include the best selling crime novel “Flower Net” and the personal family history “On golden Mountain: The 100 Year Odyssey of My Chinese American Family.”

From Lisa See’s Web site: “It’s 1938 in San Francisco: a world’s fair is preparing to open on Treasure Island, a war is brewing overseas, and the city is alive with possibilities. Grace, Helen, and Ruby, three young women from very different backgrounds, meet by chance at the exclusive and glamorous Forbidden City nightclub. Grace Lee, an American-born Chinese girl, has fled the Midwest with nothing but heartache, talent, and a pair of dancing shoes. Helen Fong lives with her extended family in Chinatown, where her traditional parents insist that she guard her reputation like a piece of jade. The stunning Ruby Tom challenges the boundaries of convention at every turn with her defiant attitude and no-holds-barred ambition.”

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An Interview with Ex-CIA Attorney John Rizzo

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Note: This program was originally broadcast February 2, 2014.

Rick Kleffel speaks with the man who was once the CIA’s top lawyer – John Rizzo, about the torture tapes, enhanced Interrogation techniques, dirty assets, drone strikes and about his new book, Company Man.

“Even inside the bubble, you find yourself fairly alone…” — John Rizzo

Rick Kleffel wrote:
I was most interested in the historical aspects of the story, and that’s where I took much of our conversation. There’s a very nice JFK connection in the book, and a scene that is impeccably described. We talked about Iran-Contra, and the part he would have willingly played had he been in the wrong place at the right time. All through the conversation, I have to say that John Rizzo was right there. I think that he was relieved to talk with someone who had read the book, and he was clearly happy to discuss events in the book that were not the focus of recent media attention.

Fantasy Writer Tad Williams

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Tad Williams’ newest books are hard-boiled detective stories with a fantasy twist; the detective is angel Bobby Dollar.

By Rick Kleffel

Attitude is everything in the Bobby Dollar books by Tad Williams. The Angel Doloriel, aka Bobby Dollar, tells the story in some of the most enjoyable, hilarious, smartest prose you can find in this particular veil of tears. Following hot on the heels of ‘The Dirty Streets of Heaven,’ ‘Happy Hour in Hell’ follows the narrative model of the first book. We start in the middle, in this case as Bobby crosses a bridge into hell, then whip back to the beginning and take the story straight up, no chasers.

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Author Roz Chast, “The Beginning of the End” to “The End”

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By Rick Kleffel

Roz Chast Asks ‘Can’t We Talk About Something More Pleasant?’

No.

You’d think that living here in the 21st century, we’d be comfortable with death. It’s not as if we haven’t seen enough of it. But everyday, natural, he-lived-a-long-life-and-then-dropped-dead death gives us the heebies to the point where we’ve let ourselves be convinced that anything is better. Plus, there’s a healthy profit in tending to those who might otherwise have died but can be kept alive long enough to cash out every penny they had ever scrimped, saved and hidden away for that rainy day. If only it were just a day.

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Writer Sarah Lotz

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Read a review of Sarah Lutz’s The Three, by Rick Kleffel.

Author Sarah Lutz

Author Sarah Lutz

Sarah Lotz is something of a contradiction in terms. Here’s her first novel, by my reckoning, ‘The Three.’ Bu there are three in the “Also By” list, and I come to understand she’s part of three other “writers,” that is single names on the cover that prove to be collaborations, including one with her daughter.

“…people need answers…”

— Sarah Lotz

To be honest, she looks far too young to have a daughter with whom she could collaborate, but she tells me that this is the case. The point being, if ‘The Three’ seems like a remarkably accomplished first novel, then that’s because like most “first” novels, it’s actually, well, pretty far down the line.

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Interview with Author Bill Bryson

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This program was originally broadcast November 11, 2013.

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“It was the most amazingly eventful and magical summer…”
—Bill Bryson

Bill Bryson’s new book  ”One Summer: America, 1927″ digs into a transitional year in the history of the United States. His past books include  ”A Walk in the Woods,” “A History of Everything” and several other nonfiction books. KUSP’s Rick Kleffel spoke with Bryson about how he selects the subjects for his books and the importance of Charles LIndbergh to his latest.

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Interview with Author Steven Galloway

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Creating Harry Houdini

Martin Strauss makes some extraordinary claims at the beginning of Steven Galloway’s ‘The Confabulist,’ and like all such declarations, they require extraordinary proof. With Steven Galloway, Martin Strauss and novel’s focal point, Harry Houdini, you’re in precisely the right company to obtain it. Galloway’s novel manages to be a tense, imaginative historical thriller while simultaneously being a poignant mediation about love and loss.

The title of the novel suggests how it’s possible to reconcile such opposing literary notions. Confabulation is what happens when memories are blurred and the imagination supplies supposed facts to fill in the blanks. As we meet Martin Strauss, he’s not in the best shape. Suffering from tinnitus, and racked with guilt, he claims to have met Harry Houdini. Before we can blink our eyes, Galloway introduces us to Houdini, and the novel rockets forward and backward through Houdini’s life and Martin’s.

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