KUSP Latest

10 Days of Pushing Boundaries

Kirby Scudder speaks with Greg Paroff who performs “ENGEL THE ELDER’S BARD, BEAT$, & BURLESQUE.” The show intersperse stand-up comedy, hip-hop and Shakespeare monologues. It’s one of the shows in the Santa Cruz Fringe Festival July 11-20.

The festival Web site descibes Paroff’s shows with this quote from the Santa Cruz Weekly’s Georgia Perry, ”Let me say this: You certainly do not have to be a fan of Shakespeare to enjoy this show. In fact, Shakespeare-haters may even like it more.”

2013 Fringe Festival Information: Fringe Festival Website

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The Art Of Food: Museum Celebrates Iconic Catalan Chef’s Cuisine

By Amy Guttman | NPR’s The Salt | July 6, 2013

Catalan chef Ferran Adrià poses with plasticine models of his food on display at Somerset House in London. A new exhibit looks back at the influential modernist chef and his landmark restaurant, El Bulli.

Catalan chef Ferran Adrià poses with plasticine models of his food on display at Somerset House in London. A new exhibit looks back at the influential modernist chef and his landmark restaurant, El Bulli. Photo: Matthew Lloyd/Getty Images for Somerset House

The man once hailed as the “Salvador Dali of the kitchen” is getting his own art exhibit.

Ferran Adrià might not be a household name, but for nearly three decades, as chef and mastermind of the acclaimed Catalan Spanish restaurant El Bulli, he moussed, foamed and otherwise re-imagined cuisine in modernist ways that have inspired many of the world’s top chefs.

(more…)

“A Spare $1,000 To do Something Awesome”

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feastBy J.D. Hillard | KUSP News

An event tonight at the Tannery Art Center in Santa Cruz allows artists to present their ideas for new projects. Audience members each pay $20 and votes at the end of he night for one project to take the entire pool. Organizer Kevin Devaney says the event inspires new projects.

“It allows artists all across his community to think ‘If I had an extra one- to two thousand dollars to spend on something awesome, what would I do?’”

Feast is hosted by the Santa Cruz Institute of Contemporary Art, find more information at their Web site.

Made Entirely of Salt

Photo: Makoto Morisawa. Courtesy of the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art, College of Charleston School of the Arts.

Photo: Makoto Morisawa. Courtesy of the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art, College of Charleston School of the Arts.

Now Showing through August 25, 2013

From the Monterey Museum of Art:
“Motoi Yamamoto is an internationally acclaimed contemporary Japanese artist from Hiroshima, Japan, who creates elaborate, site-specific installations made entirely out of salt. Often in the form of large-scale labyrinths or aerial projections of typhoons, Yamamoto takes one of the earth’s oldest, most sought-after mineral elements to cover the entire gallery floors during a two-week residency at the Monterey Museum of Art—Pacific Street location. (more…)

Mel Brooks, Mel Brooks, Mel Brooks

Mel Brooks catching up on the present in between takes of History Of The World: Part I. (Photo by Pamela Barkentin Blackburn.)

Mel Brooks catching up on the present in between takes of History Of The World: Part I. (Photo by Pamela Barkentin Blackburn.)

The one and only Mel Brooks is amidst a gigantic media splash this week – starting with:

On KUSP
1: Interview with Jeesie Thorn on Bullseye Sunday, May 19, 8 p.m.

2. Interview with Terry Gross on Fresh Air, Monday, May 20, 6 p.m.

ON KQED/PBS
3. Mel Brooks: Make a Noise,  American Masters Monday, May 20, 9 p.m.

 

 

 
 
Jessie Thorn write about Mel Brooks:

It’s hard to imagine what American comedy would look like without Mel Brooks. With a sharp eye for parody, a seemingly infinite supply of gags, and enough destruction of the fourth wall to make a postmodern novelist blush, his work has set the tone for countless comedy TV shows and films. It’s hard to imagine SNL‘s relentless TV parodies without Your Show Of Shows(which Brooks wrote for alongside Sid Caesar back in the 50s), The Simpsons without his filmography full of sly pop-culture references, or the careers of Airplane! creators Zucker, Abrahams and Zucker without Brooks’ shameless love of (self-admittedly) awful jokes.

Ted Explores Beauty

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Do we need beauty to enjoy ourselves, or do we need it to survive? Image: npr.org

Do we need beauty to enjoy ourselves, or do we need it to survive? Image: npr.org

Beauty surrounds us, draws us in, gives joy and creates conflict. In this hour, TED speakers conjure up beauty both ancient and modern, and suggest reasons why humans are hardwired to crave and respond to beauty.

Find the five-part show here

In the attached part one of the episode, Denis Dutton was a philosophy professor and the editor of Arts & Letters Daily, before his death in 2010. Dutton also taught philosophy at the University of Canterbury in New Zealand. He has a provocative theory on beauty — that art, music and other beautiful things, far from being simply “in the eye of the beholder,” are a core part of human nature with deep evolutionary origins.

Sampling PHOTO ID at MAH

Go see the show! More coverage on KUSP.org coming soon.

This Museum-wide photography exhibition is centered on the theme of identity. Loosely broken into three subthemes: self, social and gender, we will present artworks to stimulate reflection and lively discussion. – MAH website info

At the Santa Cruz Museum of Art and History: PHOTO ID March 30 – July 7, 2013

Photograph by Janice Suhji, from the “Dreams II: High School” series.

Photograph by Janice Suhji, from the “Dreams II: High School” series.

Super mini slideshow:

Angelca Muro make me pretty-2005

Angelca Muro, 'Make Me Pretty' 2005

Beth Yarnelle Edwards

Beth Yarnelle Edwards

Drew Miller Self-Portrait

Drew Miller Self-Portrait

HillyardSusan2

Susan Hillyard

Miguel

Miguel

Shmuel Thaler Triathlon_feet

Shmuel Thaler, ' Triathlon Feet'

SJHoisington_PerformArtist-CancerSurvivor

SJ Hoisington

Bay Lights is Turned On

Image: Courtesy of Youtube

Image: Courtesy of Youtube

The Bay Bridge has a new light sculpture attached to it. ‘Bay Lights’ is made up of 25,000 led lights, and is planned to have a two-year life span. Artist Leo Villareal spent over 2 years working on the project, which coincides with the 75th anniversary of the bridge. Watch live stream.

Lift Off for The Muse

Thursday, February 28 was the night musicians, performers, artists  and concerned citizens poured into the new gallery space for the Santa Cruz Institute of Contemporary Arts (SCICA) to help make a fuss about the new Santa Cruz arts blog.

Photos: Stephen Laufer

harp-auction

A Twist on Nature

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Fanne Fernow’s Enchanted Broccoli Forest, in the Alter Eco show at the Tannery Arts Center. Photo: Laufer

By J.D. Hillard | KUSP News

One of the Monterey Bay area’s newest galleries is in the midst of its second art show. Alter Eco continues through March at the Santa Cruz Institute of Contemporary Arts.

Artist Crystal Kamoroff.

Surrounded by stark large-format two-dimensional art and a couple of installations that just bear looking at and mulling over, are three arm-sized towers, bright green with circles and dots up and down their length. Santa Cruz Institute of Contemporary Arts director Ann Hazels, who curated the show, says the suggest life and evolution.

“They tend to have this little lean and kind of sway to them in their gestures.” Hazels says.  ”To me in that pose it kind of automatically references a weed or a fern.”

Fanne Fernow’s Enchanted Broccoli Forest is made through encaustic, a process that’s becoming popular among painters. It involves embedding paint and other material in layers of wax. In this case the encaustic is layered on plaster forms. The piece stands out with its color and overt whimsy. Much of the art in Alter Eco tends toward grays and de-saturated color. Ryan Jones’ installation “Twin Arcs” spans an entire wall with radiating lines of blue construction chalk, imbuing the entire show with a sense of austerity. It could be a cold show, but that’s clearly not what Hazel’s was going for. Opposite “Twin Arcs” is what looks like a cozy corner, with chairs and books. This is sort of an excerpt from Jody Alexander’s “Evanescence.”

“We selected Jody’s work for the exhibitiion because we wanted there to b some reference to human,” Hazels says. “How dos man and person fit into nature and environment.”

Prior to the opening, SCICA director Ann Hazels, works on labels for the art. Photo: Laufer

You couldn’t sit in the chair or read the books. Not in the usual way. The chairs are intricately stitched with blond bundles of paper. The shelves are deeply layered with pages of the same paper.

“Because she’s using antique furniture and things that we sit on, things that we put our books on, picture frames with a book inside of it, there’s a direct and immediate reference,” Hazels says.

Alter Eco flirts with nature and landscape. Steve Laufer’s dazzling swirls of black and white include no representation of landscape, but he insists you’ll find landscape in there. In their fractal-like shapes, they might suggest something geological. In Michael Myers’s photographs washed-out prints of Midwest landscapes barely stand out against brushed metal backing. And in Jody Alexander’s book installation, Hazels sees the sandstone.

“The way she has fiber layered on top of itself it references sediment or rocks, the way earth is in the southwest,” Hazels says.

An SCICA announcement explains the exhibit “explores the concept of physical and emotional transition through photography, sculpture, and installation.” The selection of art in Alter Eco portrays natural change and impermanence and a variety of emotions that accompany those qualities. He Santa Cruz Institute for Contemporary Arts gallery is at the Tannery art Center in Santa Cruz.

Video produced by SCICA: