Musica della sera

John O’Conor plays Beethoven’s 12th Piano Sonata

John O'Conor

Irish pianist John O’Conor is our future artist in presenting the complete set of Beethoven piano sonatas.

On this program we feature Piano Sonata No. 12 in A-flat major, Op. 26 by Ludwig van Beethoven.  “The third movement incorporates a funeral march.  This is the only movement from his sonatas that Beethoven arranged for orchestra, and was played during Beethoven’s own funeral procession in 1827.” (Wikipedia)

The program begins with sacred music for Holy Week.

Click Here to listen to pianist András Schiff talk about this particular sonata, as well as demonstrate illustrative passages.

Playlist for Thursday, April 17, 2014

(Playlist Index)

 

Approx. Time
Composer
Selection
Performers
Record Title
Label
7:00
Traditional
Pater Noster (Our Father); An tAiseiri (The Resurrection); Ar nAthair(Our Father)
Nóirín Ní Riain; The Monks of Glenstal Abbey
Vox de Nube (Voice form the Cloud)
Sounds True
 
The Seven Sorrows of the Virgin Mary I; Friday’s Lament
The Virgin’s Lament
Sounds True
 
Notre Pere (Ottche Nach)
Choir of the Benedictine Monks  of the Union (Chevetogne)
Chants de Liturgie Slavonne
Harmonia Mundi
 
William Byrd
In Assumptione Beatae Mariae Virginis
Chanticleer
Byrd: Missa in tempore paschali
Harmonia Mundi
7:40
Traditional
The Seven Sorrows of the Virgin Mary II
Noirin Ni Riaian; The Monks of Glenstal Abbey
The Virgin’s Lament
Sounds True
7:50
Dietrich Buxtehude
Membra Jesu Nostri: I. Ad pedes (feet); III. Ad manus (hands)
Cantus Cölln; Konrad Junghänel, conductor
Buxtehude: Membra Jesu Nostri
Harmonia Mundi
8:10
J.S. Bach
Oboe Concerto in G Minor, BWV 1056
Malcolm Messiter, oboe; Guildhall String Ensemble
Baroque Oboe Concertos
RCA
8:20
Francesco Durante
Concerto in E Minor for String Orchestra and Basso Continuo
Collegium Aureum; Rolf Reinhardt, conductor
Francesco Durante: Four Concerti for String Orchestra and Basso Continuo
BASF (LP)
8:30
Tomaso Albinoni
Oboe Concerto in D Minor, Op. 9, No.2
Malcolm Messiter, oboe; Guildhall String Ensemble
Baroque Oboe Concertos
RCA
 
W.A. Mozart
Horn Concerto in E-Flat Major, K. 495
Ab Koster, natural horn; Tafelmusik; Bruno Weil, conductor
Mozart Horn Conertos
Sony
9:00
Ludwig van Beethoven
Piano Sonata No. 12 in A-Flat Major, Op.26
John O’Conor, piano
Beethoven: Piano Sonatas, Volume V
Telarc

 

─N.M.

 

Musica della sera is a classical music radio show broadcast Thursday nights, 7:00-9:30 pm (Pacific) on KUSP Santa Cruz, 88.9 FM. Listen Live or listen to the Most Recent Show.
Follow us on Twitter: Meera and Nicholas and on Facebook: Meera, Nicholas,
and Musica della sera. Opinion expressed there and here is our own and doesn’t
reflect that of the station. A note about playlists and Listener Feedback.

Ill Wind, Flanders & Swann

A patter song in the tradition of Gilbert & Sullivan on the subject of the French Horn, to the tune of a horn concerto rondo by W.A. Mozart (q.v.).

Flanders and Swann

Flanders and Swann – Ill Wind – Mozart Horn Concerto

Mozart Horn K495 Rondo

The Source: Rondo from Mozart’s Horn Concerto in E Flat, K.495

Michael Flanders & Donald Swann

Michael Flanders & Donald Swann

 

─N.M.

Our Arms Are Not Tired

Our Arms Are Not Tired

 

What is choral music?

It is many voices, joined together, standing together, creating something together that wasn’t there before.

It is holy, this process. We stand together, holding each other up, offering our strengths when another is weak, encouraging each other to learn, to grow.

We follow a director. Sometimes.

We trust that director, and have faith that our director knows what he or she is doing, even if we don’t agree.

We bring our own experiences to the ensemble, adding our own joy, our own sorrow, our own challenges, our own process. We stand together and help distill our experiences into one shared experience.

We laugh in rehearsal. We make jokes that only we understand.

We weep in rehearsal. It is hard not to be moved by the intimacy and rawness of the experience.

We get angry and frustrated when the music is harder than we want it to be. We get angry and frustrated with each other. We get angry at ourselves.

We get tired. Music is hard.

We let go of the things over which we have no control. We have faith that everyone else will sing.

We admire other singers’ talents, other singers’ passion, other singers’ experiences.

We support each other.

We are community.

* * *

This week’s Musica della sera was dedicated to Ron Drake, and his wife, Mary Maggini. Ron has been fighting cancer for the last two years, and was nearing the end of his fight. I had hoped that I could play some music that would help ease his passing. Ron is a self-taught musician, a pianist, and loved the music of the Beatles. He would play a piece over and over, and teach himself how to make the music that he heard.

Ron (aka “MacDaffy”) and Mary (“Melmo”) met in an online forum. The community that formed in that place was more than just a bunch of people getting together to argue politics. We talked about art, music, writing, politics, parenting, technology, media, relationships, and silly stuff. We talked about our lives and told stories, wrote poetry together, and connected even closer than many friends in person connect. We supported each other through rough times — even sent money when we were in crisis. When we travel, we crash on each other’s couches and have loud raucous dinners or picnics or gatherings, known as “F2Fs” (face-to-faces). We went on vacations together. (One vacation my family took to the Jersey shore with other members of this community, I will always remember my son Julian looking up at me as we jumped in the waves of the Atlantic Ocean, and saying, “Mama? This is the best day of my whole entire life.” He was seven.)

More than one marriage resulted from this community. Ron and Mary were one of them. I’m not entirely sure when they met, but it wasn’t that long ago. They talked, they connected. The spark that began then ignited into fire, and they were married soon after, on December 29, 2011. They lived together in a little house with a big garden and dogs and art and a piano and music and books and beautiful things. I often said that I wanted to be adopted by them.

And soon after that, he was diagnosed with prostate cancer.

Mary and Ron fought the cancer. They researched. Mary discovered cannabis oil, and Ron responded so very well to that treatment. (She is now a huge advocate of the use of medicinal cannabis.) He was already bald, so at least he didn’t have to lose his hair again! They argued, they loved. He would walk into a room and say, “I must put my lips on you!” and kiss her on the head. His smile was reflected in her eyes, always.

Mary and Ron recently disappeared from the community for a few months. I wondered where they were, and wondered how they were doing. But Mary came back online about a week ago, with the news that Ron was nearing the end of his journey on this earth.

The community outswelling was inspiring. Over 200 people — more than I realized were even as a part of the community — posted words of support. So many heartfelt words, so much poetry, so many beautiful photographs, so much music. We all knew what this community meant to them, and we all wanted them to know that they mean just as much to us. A meme arose out of our collective grief: Our Arms Are Not Tired. We are not tired of holding them in the light, holding them close to our hearts, wishing Ron safe and secure passage, wishing Mary the strength she needed and the safety to be weak when she couldn’t be strong any more.

I live very close to Melmo and Mac (collectively known as “Melmac”), but didn’t want to intrude on their final days together. But I did want to give them something, and what better than choral music.

Music of a community. Voices joined together in support in love. Many coming together to weep, to laugh, to remember, to support.

Ron and Mary listened to Musica della sera last night. They listened to the music. They listened to the words.

And about one hour after the show was over, Ron slept.

Rest in peace, Ron Drake, MacDaffy. And Mary? We’re still here for you. Our arms are still not tired.

–Meera

 

* * *

Playlist for Thursday, April 10, 2014

(Playlist Index)

Time Composer Selection Performers Record Title Label
7:00 Erik Satie Trois gymnopedies Riri Shimada, piano Music for You
(2001)
Sony Classical
Samuel Barber Let down the bars, O Death Los Angeles Chamber Singers, Peter Rutenberg, conductor Shenandoah: An American Chorister 1890 – 1990
(1994)
Klavier
John Tavener
(1944-2013)
As one who has slept Polyphony, Stephen Layton, conductor John Tavener Hyperion
7:15 Felix Mendelssohn Songs Without Words:▪          Nos. 1, 2, 7, 9, 12, 18, 25 Daniel Adni, piano Mendelssohn: Songs without Words
(1996)
EMI Classics
8:00 Arvo Pärt
(b. 1935)
Nunc dimittisWhich was the Son of… Polyphony, Stephen Layton, conductor Triodion Hyperion
John Tavener Song of the Angel The Choir and Orchestra of The Academy of Ancient Music, Paul Goodwin, director Eternity’s Sunrise Harmonia Mundi
8:15 William Kennerly
(b. 1940)
Angel’s Flight: A Tone Poem I Cantori, Edward Cansino, conductor A Choir of Angels Civic Classics
8:20 Morten Lauridsen
(b. 1943)
Lux Aeterna (1997)▪          Introitus

▪          In te, Domine, speravi

▪          Oh nata lux

▪          Veni, Sancte Spiritus

▪          Agnus Dei – Lux aeterna

Polyphony, Stephen Layton, conductorBritten Sinfonia, Pauline Lowbury, leader Morten Lauridsen: Lux aeterna
(2003)
Hyperion
Arr. Jonathan Quick Sea-FeverGoin’ Home O Musica Intima Clear Atma
9:00 Ludwig van Beethoven
(1770 – 1820)
Sonata No. 11 in B flat major, Op. 22▪          Allegro con brio

▪          Adagio con molto espressione

▪          Tempo di Menuetto

▪          Rondo. Allegretto

Paul Lewis, piano Beethoven: #2 Paul Lewis Harmonia Mundi
U2, Arr. Chilcott MLK Cantus On the Shoulders of Giants
(2012)
www.cantussings.org

 

The words and poetry interspersed between Mendelssohn’s Songs Without Words are below. These are words from the community that Ron and Mary have been a part of.

Read the rest of this entry »

András Schiff plays Beethoven

 

Musica della sera

Thursdays on KUSP, 7:00-9:30pm (PT)

Hosted this week by Nicholas Mitchell

Listen Live

 

Andras Schiff Foto: Manfred Thomas

 

We resume our presentation of the complete set of Beethoven piano sonatas with Sonata No. 10 in G major, Op. 14, No. 2. Completed in 1799. (Few remember the Y18C panic of that year.)  The featured artist is Hungarian-born pianist András Schiff.

This sonata is a family favorite, one that Meera studied and enjoys playing herself.

As a bonus, here is a fascinating recording of András Schiff talking about, and demonstrating passages from, the 10th piano sonata!  A real treat.

Playlist for Thursday, April 3, 2014

(Playlist Index)

 

Approx. Time Composer Selection Performers Record Title Label
7:00 Frederic Chopin Etude in E Major, Op. 10, No.3 Nobuyuki Tsujii, piano Thirteenth Van Cliburn International Piano Competition Gold Medalist Harmonia Mundi
  Andante Spianato and Grande Polonaise in E-Flat major, Op. 22 Jon Nakamatsu, piano Tenth Van Cliburn International Piano Competition Gold Medalist Harmonia Mundi
  W. A. Mozart Adagio and Rondo in C Major, K. 617: I. Adagio; II. Rondo Dennis James, armonica; The Emerson String Quartet Cristal: Glass Music through the Ages Sony
7:30 Gabriel Faure Pavane, Op.50 Dennis James, Cristal baschet; Ruth Ann Swenson and Linda Ronstadt, sopranos
  Alessandro Scarlatti O cessate di piagarmi Dennis James, armonica; Linda Ronstadt, soprano
  Johann Adolf Hasse Cantate L’armonica (excerpts): Recit Accompagné – Adagio; Air – Andantino Dennis James, Armonica; Veronique Dietschy, soprano; Ensemble Stradivaria; Daniel Cuiller, conductor
8:00 Ludwig van Beethoven Sonata No.10 in G Major, Op.14, No.2 Andras Schiff, piano Beethoven: The Piano Sonatas, Volume III ECM
8:30 Resignation Iris Vermillion, mezzo-soprano; Peter Stamm, piano Beethoven: Lieder CPO
  Johannes Brahms Wiegenlied Bernarda Fink, mezzo-soprano; Roger Vignoles, piano Brahms: Lieder Harmonia Mundi
  Ralph Vaughan Williams The Woodcutters Song James Bowman, countertenor; Kenneth Weiss, piano Songs of Ariel Satirino
  Benjamin Britten I know a bank; Down by the Salley Gardens
  Ludwig van Beethoven Sally in Our Alley Robert White, tenor; Yo-Yo Ma, cello; Ani Kavafian, violin; Samuel Sanders, piano Beethoven Folk Songs RCA
  David Wilde The Cellist of Sarajevo Yo-Yo Ma, cello Solo Sony
  Ennio Morricone Gabriel’s Oboe (from the film: The Mission) Yo-Yo Ma, cello; Roma Sinfonietta; Ennio Morricone, conducting Appassionato Sony
9:00 pm Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky Violin Concerto in D Major, Op.35 Jascha Heifetz, violin; Chicago Symphony Orchestra; Fritz Reiner, violin Jascha Heifetz: The Supreme RCA

 

Heifetz Japanese Style

Heifetz in stripes — date and loca­tion unknown.

The program concluded with Jascha Heifetz’s exhilarating performance of the Tchaikovsky violin concerto.

 

─N.M.

 

Musica della sera is a classical music radio show broadcast Thursday nights, 7:00-9:30 pm (Pacific) on KUSP Santa Cruz, 88.9 FM.  Listen Live or listen to the Most Recent Show.
Follow us on Twitter: Meera and Nicholas and on Facebook: Meera, Nicholas,
and Musica della sera. Opinion expressed there and here is our own and doesn’t
reflect that of the station. A note about playlists and Listener Feedback.

Kings College Choir: Budgetary Restraints Edge Out Boy Trebles

The Helium Solution

Helium for those ridiculously high notes will save the choir thousands.

“As a result of regulatory pressure, the Choir of King’s College Cambridge is to stop using boy trebles, it was announced today. The high voices in the choir have been provided by boys for more than five centuries. In future, high vocal parts will be performed by altos breathing helium. In a recent performance, the choral scholars demonstrate this new technique with Gregorio Allegri’s Miserere mei, Deus. Do not try this at home.”

─NM

When Lilacs Last…

lilacs

 

Playlist for Thursday, March 27, 2014

Hosted by Meera Collier-Mitchell

Time Composer Selection Performers Record Title Label
7:00 William Byrd
(1543 – 1623)
Mass for three voices (1593 – 4)▪          Kyrie▪          Gloria▪          Credo

▪          Sanctus & Benedictus

▪          Agnus Dei

The Tallis Scholars, Peter Phillips, director The Tallis Scholars: William Byrd
(collection recorded in 1987 and 1984)
Gimmell
7:20 Gerald Finzi
(1901 – 1956)
Let Us Garlands Bring, Op. 18Text by William Shakespeare▪          Come away, come away, death▪          Who is Silvia?

▪          Fear no more the heat o’ the sun

▪          O Mistress mine

▪          It was a lover and his lass

Bryn Terfel, baritoneMalcolm Martineau, piano The Vagabond
(1995)
Deutsche Grammophon
7:45 Jan Sandström
(b. 1954)
The Word Became Flesh Chanticleer By Request
(2012)
Chanticleer Records
Daniel-Lesur
(1908 – 2002)
ÉpithalameFrom Le Cantique des cantiques
Henryk Mikołaj Górecki
(1933 – 2010)
Totus Tuus
(9:52)
The Concordia Choir, René Clausen, conductor In the New Moon
(1998)
Concordia Recordings
8:00 Paul Hindemith
(1895 – 1963)
When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom’d:
A Requiem for Those We LoveText by Walt WhitmanPrelude

  1. When lilacs last in the dooryard bloom’d
  2. Arioso, In the swamp
  3. March, Over the breast of spring
  4. O western orb
  5. Arioso, Sing on, there in the swamp
  6. Song, O how shall I warble
  7. Introduction and Fugue, Lo! Body and soul
  8. Sing on! you gray-brown bird
  9. Death Carol, Come, lovely and soothing Death
  10. To the tally of my soul
  11. Finale, Passing the visions
Atlanta Symphony Orchestra & Chorus, Robert Shaw, conductorWilliam Stone, baritoneJan DeGaetani, mezzo-soprano When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom’d:
A Requiem for Those We Love
(1987)
Telarc
9:15 Charles-Camille Saint-Saëns
(1835 – 1921)
Rapsodie d’Auvergne, for Piano and Orchestra, op. 73 Gabriel Tacchino, pianoOrchestra of Radio Luxembourg, Louis deFroment, conductor Saint-Saëns: The Complete Music for Piano and Orchestra
(1993)
VoxBox
Ronn McFarlane ▪          Sycamore▪          Dowland’s Goodnight Ronn McFarlane, lute Indigo Road
(2007)
Dorian

 

—MCM

Musica della sera playlists

An instrument you all know, but with a new take

Bowed piano ensemble

https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=14jPvnWhdNM

Composer Stephen Scott and the Bowed Piano Ensemble perform Scott’s piece “Entrada.”

—MCM

 

Awadagin Pratt takes on Beethoven’s 9th (piano sonata)

 

Musica della sera

Thursdays on KUSP, 7:00-9:30pm (PT)

Hosted this week by Nicholas Mitchell

Listen Live

 

awadaginpratt

We’re in our 9th week and onto our 9th piano sonata featuring our 9th pianist.  Can we make it through all 32 Beethoven piano sonatas without double dipping?  That’s my hope.  Born in Pittsburgh, Awadagin Pratt grew up and studied (piano, violin, tennis) in Illinois.  From what I can determine, his first name sounds a lot like “a wad o’ gin”, a sure proof mnemonic for me.  With an accent on the wad. Consult the IPA transliteration from his Wikipedia page: /ɑːwɑːˈdɑːɪn/

Picking up where Meera left off in the English Renaissance and in that spirit of spring, we start the show with the Lady Musick, soprano Emma Kirkby, creating some remarkable bird calls in her rendition of John Bartlett’s “Sweete birdes deprive us never”.

And make room for Borodin’s Polovetsian dances, mentioned in a previous Musica della sera blog post.  That’ll make it Borodin three weeks in a row for us.

 

 

Playlist for Thursday, March 20, 2014

(Playlist Index)

 

Time
Composer
Selection
Performers
Record Title
Label
7:00
Robert Jones
If in this flesh
Emma Kirkby, soprano; Anthony Rooley, lute
Elizabethan Songs: The Lady Musick
L’oiseau Lyre
 
John Bartlett
Sweete birdes deprive us never
 
Thomas Morley (or Nicholas Strogers?)
In Nomine Pavan
Linde Consort; Konrad Ragossing, lute
Altenglische Consortmusik
Reflexe (LP)
 
William Byrd?
My Lord of Oxenfords maske
 
Richard Allison
Goe from my window
 
Anthony Holborne
Suite: 1. Sedet sola; 2. Galliard; 3. Pavanaploravit; 4. The fairie-round
7:30
Thomas Morley (or John Dowland?)
Galliard to Captaine Pipers Pavin
 
John Dowland?
Lacrimae Pavin
 
Henry Purcell
Music for a While; Fairest Isle; Who Can BeholdFlorella’s Charms?; I Attempt from Love’s Sickness  to Fly
Andrew Dalton, countertenor; AnnekeUittenbosch, harpsichord; Freek Borstlap, violada gamba
Purcell Songs
Etcetera
 
John Blow
Shepherds Deck Your Crooks; Ah Heav’n! WhatIs’t I Hear?; Epilogue: Sing, Sing Ye Muses (from “Amphion Anglicus”)
Rene Jacobs, countertenor; Max Van Egmond, bass; Marius Van Altena, tenor; Nobuko Yamamoto and Nelly Van Der Spek, sopranos;Anner Bylsma, baroque cello; GustavLeonhardt, conductor
John Blow: Ode on the Death of Mr. Henry Purcell; Songs from “Amphion Anglicus”
ABC Seon (LP)
8:00
From Henry VIII’s Book of 1520
Madame d’amours; Consort Piece XX; Absent I am; My heartly service (The Pleugh Song)
The Hilliard Ensemble and members of the New London Consort
Popular Music form the Time of Henry VIII
Saga (LP)
 
John Dowland
I saw my Ladye weepe
Emma Kirkby, soprano; Anthony Rooley, lute
Elizabethan Songs: The Lady Musick
L’oiseau Lyre
 
William Byrd (arr. Francis Cutting)
The Woods So Wild
Julian Bream, lute
The Woods So Wild
RCA
 
Anonymous (arr. Francis Cutting)
Packington’s Pound
8:30
Anthony Holborne
The Fairy Round; Heigh Ho Holiday
 
Anonymous (arr. Francis Cutting)
Green Sleeves
 
Joseph Haydn
Guitar Quartet in E Major
Julian Bream, guitar; Members of the Cremona String Quartet
Julian Bream and Friends
RCA
9:00
Ludwig van Beethoven
Piano Sonata No. 9 in E major, Op. 14, No. 1
Awadagin Pratt, piano
Beethoven Piano Sonatas
EMI
 
Alexander Borodin
Polovetsian Dances, from the opera Prince Igor.
New York Philharmonic Orchestra; Leonard Bernstein, conductor
Russian Spectaculars
CBS

 

─NM

 

Musica della sera is a classical music radio show broadcast Thursday nights, 7:00-9:30 pm (Pacific) on KUSP Santa Cruz, 88.9 FM.  Listen Live or listen to the Most Recent Show.
Follow us on Twitter: Meera and Nicholas and on Facebook: Meera, Nicholas,
and Musica della sera. Opinion expressed there and here is our own and doesn’t
reflect that of the station. A note about playlists and Listener Feedback.

 

Music as Harbinger of Spring

spring_music

 

Musica della sera

Classical Music 7:00-9:30pm

Playlist for Thursday, March 13, 2014

Hosted by Meera Collier-Mitchell

Time Composer Selection Performers Record Title Label
7:00 William Byrd
(c. 1540 – 1623)
Why do I use my paper, ink, and pen? The Choir of Magdalen College, Oxford; Fretwork; Bill Ives, director Second Service & Consort Anthems
(2007)
Harmonia Mundi
Thomas Tallis
(1505 – 1585)
O ye tender babes The Theatre of Voices, Paul Hillier, director William Byrd: Motets and Mass for four voices
(1992)
BMG Music
Richard Edwards
(1524 – 1566)
In going to my naked bed
7:15 Robert Parsons
(c. 1575 – 1623)
In Nomine IV a 7

The song called trumpets a 6

Hespèrion XX, Jordi Savall, director Elizabethan Consort Music: 1558 – 1603
(1998)
Alia Vox
  Antonio Vivaldi
(1678 – 1741)
Concerto in G Major for Oboe and Bassoon, RV 545

  • Andante molto
  • Largo
  • Allegro molto
City of London Sinfonia; Nicholas Kraemer, director and harpsichord Vivaldi: Wind Concerti
(1995)
Naxos
7:30 Tomaso Albinoni
(1671 – 1751)
Trumpet Concerto in B flat Op. 7. No. 3

  1. Allegro
  2. Adagio
  3. Allegro
Maurice André, trumpetEnglish Chamber Orchestra, Sir Charles Mackerras, director Maurice André: Trumpet Concertos
(1977)
EMI Classics
7:40 Ludwig van Beethoven
(1770 – 1827)
Piano Sonata No. 8 in C minor, Op. 13 “Pathétique”

  • Grave – Allegro molto e con brio
  • Adagio cantabile
  • Rondo: Allegro
Gerhard Oppitz, piano Ludwig van Beethoven: Piano Sonatas (Vol. 1) Hänssler
8:00 Billy Joel
(b. 1949)
Reverie (Villa D’Este) Richard Joo, piano Billy Joel: Fantasies & Delusions, Op. 1-10
(2001)
Sony Classical
Felix Mendelssohn Lift Thine Eyes Cantus On the Shoulders of Giants
(2012)
cantussings.org
8:15 Lili Boulanger
(1893 – 1918)
D’un matin de printemps (for violin and piano) Olivier Charlier, violin; Roland Pidoux, cello; Emile Naoumoff, piano In Memoriam Lili Boulanger
(1993)
Marco Polo Records
Nadia Boulanger
(1887 – 1979)
Pieces for Cello and Piano

  • in E Flat Minor
  • in C Sharp Minor
8:30 Morten Lauridsen
(b. 1943)
Les chansons des roses (1993)

  1. En une seule fleur
  2. Contre qui, rose
  3. De ton rêve trop plein
  4. La rose complète
  5. Dirait-on
Polyphony, Stephen Layton, conductorMorten Lauridsen, piano Morten Lauridsen: Nocturnes
(2006)
Hyperion
Alexander Borodin
(1883 – 1887)
String Quartet No. 2

  • Mvt 3: Nocturne
Nadja Salerno-Sonnenberg, violin I; Benny Kim, violin II; Masao Kawasaki, viola; Mats Lidstrom, cello Nadia Salerno-Sonnenberg: Night and Day
(1998)
EMI Classics
9:00 Geirr Tveitt
(1908 – 1981)
Fifty Folk Tunes from Hardanger, Op. 150

  • Welcome with honour
  • Tears and laughter for a boat
  • A-wooing
  • The most beautiful song on earth
  • The long, long winter night
Leif Ove Andsnes, piano The Long, Long Winter Night
(1998)
EMI Classics
Antonio Vivaldi La Primavera: Concerto in E Major, op. 8 no. 1

  1. Allegro
  2. Largo
  3. Allegro
Kremerata BalticaGidon Kremer, solo violin and artistic director Eight Seasons
(2000)
Nonesuch
Astor Piazzolla
(1921 – 1992)
“Verano porteño”: Summer in Buenos Aires
U2, arr. Bob Chilcott MLK Cantus On the Shoulders of Giants
(2012)
cantussings.org

 

Musica della sera playlists

 

Bernard Roberts

Musica della sera

Thursdays on KUSP, 7:00-9:30pm

Hosted this week by Nicholas Mitchell

Listen Live

 

Bernard Roberts_piano

 

 

As a tribute to English pianist Bernard Roberts, who passed away last November, we will feature his performance of Piano Sonata No. 7 in D major, Opus 10, No. 3 as part of our continuing series of the complete Beethoven piano sonata. Roberts was known for his distinctive treatment of the whole cycle of 32 Beethoven sonatas.

My cohost Meera joins me as we continue our Spring Membership Drive.  We hope you will consider a pledge in support of public radio and locally produced classical music programming.  Viva la personal touch!  Call: 1-888-777-1507*, or pledge online.

An inordinate number of listener requests.  I’ll see if I can fit them all in: Lou Harrison, Anton Webern, Borodin.

Update: Serendipity and intrepidity, an example of the personal service you get from your friendly neighborhood KUSP disc jockey.  Responding to a request for Borodin’s tone poem, In the Steppes of Central Asia from a loyal KUSP listener, who just happened to be Meera Collier-Mitchell in this case, I realized we didn’t have a recording in our personal collection, or, as far as I knew, in the station library, so, on the day of the show, with the limited time my place of employ allows for lunch, I headed down to the local record store, thinking, “Wouldn’t it be great if I found this piece along with another Borodin favorite that I don’t have a recording of, The Polovetsian Dances”.  I allowed myself to believe there was a reasonable chance.

Step One: Check the Borodin section.  Strike One: Empty!

Step Two: Check the Mussorgsky section.  Maybe Steppes is included to fill out a recording of Pictures at an exhibition.  Nice try, but no beans.

Step Three: Check the orchestral anthologies.  Oy, with several rows of discs, and the composers not readily visible, I pored through them all; again, nada.  One orchestral arrangement of a Borodin string quartet movement.  Close, no stogie.

Step Four: Untrounced by strike three, I began to look through the small sections the store has for individual conductors.  I know, what are the chances?  I’d pretty much given up by this point.  But what the hey, let’s see.  Claudio Abbado, Von Karajan, Solti: zip, zip, zip…and then, Leonard Bernstein.  Whoa, what’s this?!  “Favorite Russian Spectaculars’, part of the Great Performances series, and the first two tracks: In the Steppes of Central Asia and The Polovetsian Dances!

The moral: Never give up hope!  (Well, maybe you need to draw the line somewhere: once in a while my mad persistence gets me in trouble.)

I’m a little sad that record store moments like this one are not long for this world, what with the multiplicity of new media options.  That’s exactly why I am documenting it here: future anthropologists will have an idea of what it was like in the olden days, that delicious eureka satisfaction of a hard won find.

I honored Meera’s request, and we listen to Steppes on the show. There wasn’t time to play the Polovetsian Dances, but I think I’ll fit in to my next show two weeks hence.

I like to think our passion for bringing you quality classical music pays off.  We had a wonderful show of support from our listeners during the pledge drive.  Warm thanks to everyone of you who contributed and said such nice things about us and the show when you did.

 

Playlist for Thursday, March 6 , 2014

(Playlist Index)

 

Approx. Time Composer Selection Performers Record Title Label
7:00 Händel Flute Sonata in F Major, Op.1, No.11 Jean-Pierre Rampal, flute; Robert Veyron-Lacroix, harpsichord Händel: Flute Concertos & Sonatas Erato
  Luigi Rossi Lasciate Averno (from Orfeo) Paul Elliott, tenor; The London Early Music Group; James Tyler, conductor 17th Century Bel Canto Hyperion
  Domenico Cimarosa Sonata in C-Sharp Minor; Sonata in A Major Julian Bream, guitar Julian Bream, My Favorite Albums, Disc 1: The Art of Julian Bream RCA
7:20 Lou Harrison String Quartet Set Kronos Quartet Music of Lou Harrison CRI
Alexander Borodin In the Steppes of Central Asia New York Philharmonic Orchestra; Leonard Bernstein, conductor Favorite Russian Spectaculars CBS
8:00 Debussy Reverie; Golliwogg’s Cakewalk Julian Bream and John Williams, guitar Julian Bream, My Favorite Albums, Disc 9: Julian Bream & John Williams: Live RCA
8:20 Beethoven Sonata No. 7 in D Major, Opus 10, No.3 Bernard Roberts, piano Beethoven: The Complete Piano Sonatas, Disc 5 Nimbus Records
  Lennon/McCartney (arr. Cathy Berberian) Ticket to Ride Cathy Berberian, soprano; Bruno Canino, piano Music of Our Century (anthology): original album: MagnifiCathy Wergo
  J.S. Bach (arr. Anton Webern) Fuga (Ricercata) for 6 voices Berliner Philharmoniker; Pierre Boulez, conductor Boulez conducts Webern II Deutsche Grammophon
9:00 Anton Webern Six Bagatelles for String Quartet, Op. 9 Emerson String Quartet Webern: Works for String Quartet Deutsche Grammophon
  Luigi Boccherini Introduction & Fandango from Guitar Quintet in D Major, G. 448 Julian Bream, guitar; George Malcolm, harpsichord Julian Bream, My Favorite Albums, Disc 5: Julian Bream and His Friends RCA
  Enrique Granados Danza Espanolas, Op.37: No.2. Oriental Julian Bream, guitar Julian Bream, My Favorite Albums, Disc 9: Julian Bream & John Williams: Live RCA

We sampled several performances from the excellent 10-disc CD reissue: Julian Bream: My Favorite Albums [Really, not Favourite Albums?] which I found when I was looking for the Borodin.  Julian Bream turned 80 last July and told the Guardian that though he can’t play guitar as he once did, he believes he’s a better musician than he was when he was 70.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Julian_Bream

We sampled several performances from the 10-disc CD reissue: Julian Bream: My Favorite Albums

*Easy to remember, right?  1+Triple-8 + Triple-7 + birth year of Anne Boleyn and Hungarian composer Bálint Bakfark. Meanwhile, let us explore the lovely lute music of Bálint Bakfark together, shall we?

Bakfark

Lute music of Hungarian composer Bálint Bakfark performed by Dániel Benkö

 ─NM

 

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