Musica della sera

Musica della sera is a classical music radio show
hosted alternate weeks by Meera Collier and Nicholas Mitchell
It airs Thursdays on KUSP Santa Cruz, 88.9 FM, 7:00-9:30pm (Pacific Time)

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All the music I found when I couldn’t find what I was looking for

I think I have short-term memory loss.

Last night’s show featured all the music I found when I couldn’t find what I was looking for. Made for a pretty fun show, don’t you think?

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Mozart at Seventeen (Poem)

Mozart at Seventeen

by Claire Keyes

I’d done it again: locked out of my car
that evening after the concert.
No friendly red salute as I flicked the unlock icon.

No keys and my stupid car remained indifferent
while I made the dreaded phone call
to my husband with the news

and could he come to the rescue.
The only bright thing that night was the symphony
Mozart composed at seventeen,

the year his father brought him to Vienna
to seek a position in the court of Empress Maria Theresa.
Only Salieri had won the keys to the court

and there was nothing for Amadeus.
So what does he do?
He attends the symphonies of Haydn,

glorious and inventive,
and over a period of weeks produces a music
filled with restless, angular melodies,

the oboe and flute freed into colorful bursts
that force the violins to yield. Only in the andante
does he settle into more introverted passions.

He was a teenager after all, destined
to trump Salieri, some say even Haydn.
Though he doesn’t know this at the time.

Maybe suspects it, so that three centuries later
as I was walking towards my car one evening
after a concert, fishing for my keys,

Mozart seemed to whisper: In clarity lies the serene.

Poet Claire Keyes

Poet Claire Keyes

“Mozart at Seventeen” by Claire Keyes from What Diamonds Can Do. © Cherry Grove Collections, 2015.  August 23, 2015

─NM

angel trumpets and devil trombones

Musica della sera

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Fans of Wendy Carlos may enjoy hearing the music she wrote for Stanley Kubrick’s “A Clockwork Orange.” Unless I’m mistaken, these recordings are not commercially available in a digital format.

Stanley Kubrick did not use ”Timesteps” for his film. The two pieces that follow are the opening titles based on Purcell’s “Funeral Music for Queen Mary”, with sprinklings of the ominous “Dies Irae” theme, and then the Clockwork Orange theme (Beethoviana), emulating Ludwig Van’s particular style of inserting lilting filigree between notes of a theme.

The W. Carlos’ music for “A Clockwork Orange” begins at about the 115:20 time marker (streaming for this program will expire early Friday morning, 8/28. If the time counter isn’t visible from the blog page, try the secondary option: the KUSP Music Show Player.).

 

Walter Carlos' Clockwork Orange LP Cover Art

 

Playlist for August 20, 2015

Hosted by Nicholas Mitchell

Time

(approx)

Composer

Selection

Performers

Record
Title

Label

7:00

J.S. Bach

Kleines Harmonisches Labyrinth (Introitus, Centrum, Exitus),
BWV 591; Fuge in C Minor, BWV 575; Partita sopra “O Gott,du frommer Gott”, BWV 767

Marie-Claire
Alain, organ (Gottfried Silbermann of Freiberg)

Bach:
Organ Works BWV 539, 545, 767

Erato

 

W.A. Mozart

The 17 Festival Sonatas for
Organ and Orchestra: No. 10 in F Major, K.244

E. Power Biggs, organ; The
Columbia Symphony; Zoltan Rozsnyai,
conductor

E. Power Biggs Plays Mozart:
The 17 Festival Sonatas for Organ and Orchestra

Columbia (LP)

7:30

Georg Philipp Telemann

Sonata
in A Minor for oboe and organ

Daniel Matrone, organ (Organ at the Cathedral of Agde); Jérôme Simonpoli, organ

Organ
and Oboe

Jade

 

W.A. Mozart

The 17 Festival Sonatas for Organ
and Orchestra: No. 11 in D Major, K.245; No. 12 in C Major, K.263; No. 13 in
C Major, K.274; No. 14 in C Major, K.278; No. 15 in C Major, K.328; No. 16 in
C Major, K.329; No. 17 in C Major, K.336

E. Power Biggs, organ; The
Columbia Symphony; Zoltan Rozsnyai,
conductor

E. Power Biggs Plays Mozart:
The 17 Festival Sonatas for Organ and Orchestra

Columbia (LP)

8:15

Frederic Chopin

Waltz
in C-Sharp Minor, Op. 64, No.2

Evegeny Kissin, piano

Evgeny Kissin Carnegie Hall Debut Concert

RCA Victor

 

Franz Liszt

Liebestraum No. 3

 

Sergei Prokofiev

Piano
Sonata No. 6, Op. 82

9:00

Walter Carlos

Timesteps; Title Music from A Clockwork
Orange (from Purcell’s Funeral for the “Funeral of Queen Mary”); Theme From A
Clockwork Orange (Beethoviana)

Walter Carlos, synthesizer

Walter Carlos’ Clockwork Orange

Columbia (LP)

 

Larry Kucharz

Adagio
43; Toccata 43 (fragment)

Larry Kucharz

SMPHNCS:
Electronic Symphonics

International Audiochrome

 

Craig Safan

Make the Sun Dance

Craig Safan

Rough Magic: Music Inspired by
the Paleolithic Cave Paintings of Europe

Perseverence

─N.M.
Comments and requests welcome, follow us on Twitter: MeeraNicholas, and Musica della sera (new).  Call during the show at: 831.476.2800 (local) or toll-free
800.655.5877.  
We’re also on Facebook: MeeraNicholasand Musica della sera.
Opinion expressed there and here is our own and does not reflect that of the station. A note about playlists and Listener Feedback.

 

a baffling song, no words, only the music

Against Endings

by Dorianne Laux

On the street outside the window
someone is talking to someone else,

a baffling song, no words, only the music

of voices—low contralto of questions,
laughter’s plucked strings—voices in darkness

below stars where someone straddles a bike
up on the balls of his feet, and someone else

stands firm on a curb, her arms crossed, two

dogs nearby listening to the human duet,
stars falling through a summer night

a sudden car passing, rap song thumping,

but the voices, unhurried, return, obligatos afloat
on the humid air, tiny votives wavering

as porch lights go out—not wanting it to stop—

and Mars rising over the flower shop, up
through the telephone wires

 

Dorianne Laux - Poet

Dorianne Laux – Poet (photo links to where I found it)

“Against Endings” by Dorianne Laux from Facts About the Moon. © W. W. Norton.

The Writer’s Almanac for January 21, 2015

─N.M.

Alia Vox and More

The Performer’s Voice

Tonight’s program features selections from some of my favorite recordings released by Alia Vox. From their website:

Since its creation in 1998, ALIA VOX has developed its role as the exclusive producer and publisher of all new recordings by Hesprion XXI, La Capella Reial de Catalunya, Le Concert des Nations, Montserrat Figueras & Jordi Savall.

Enjoy!
–Meera

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Playlist for August 6, 2015

Musica della sera

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7:00-9:30 PM (Pacific Time)

or

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Playlist for August 6, 2015

Hosted by Nicholas Mitchell

 

Marian Anderson by Richard Avedon, summer of 1955

Time

(approx)

Composer

Selection

Performers

Record Title

Label

7:00

Enrique Granados

Valses Poéticos; Andaluza
from Danzas españolas

Julian
Bream, guitar

Julian
Bream Plays Granados and Albéniz

RCA Red Seal

 

Johannes Brahms

Theme and Variations for Piano:
Allegro, ma moderato (Arrangement of the 2nd movement from the
String Sextet Op.18)

Emanuel
Ax, piano

Brahms Sextets, opp. 18 &
36

Sony

7:30

String
Sextet in G Major, Op. 36

Isaac
Stern and Cho-Liang Lin, violins; Jaime Laredo and Michael Tree, violas;
Yo-Yo Ma and Sharon Robinson, cellos

8:30

Sergei Rachmaninoff

Piano Concerto No.2 in C Minor,
Op. 18

Rafael
Orozco, piano; Royal Philharmonic Orchestra; Edo de Waart,
conductor

Rachmaninoff; Complete Works
for Piano and Orchestra

Philips

9:00

Isaac Albéniz

Evocación; Triana

Stephen
Hough, piano

Stephen
Hough’s Spanish Album

Hyperion

 

Trad. (Afro-American Spirituals)

Introduction; Oh, Heaven Is One
Beautiful Place, I Know; I Been in de Storm So Long; Jus’ Keep on Singin’/Ride On, King Jesus!

Marian
Anderson, contralto; John Motley and Franz Rupp, piano

He’s Got the Whole World in his
Hands

RCA

 

Stephen Sondheim

Medley:
I Wish I Could Forget You/Loving You from
Passion

Renée
Fleming, soprano; Orchestra of Welsh National Opera; Paul Gemignani,
conductor

Renée
& Bryn: Under the Stars

Decca

─N.M.
Comments and requests welcome, follow us on Twitter: MeeraNicholas, and Musica della sera (new).  Call during the show at: 831.476.2800 (local) or toll-free
800.655.5877.  
We’re also on Facebook: MeeraNicholasand Musica della sera.
Opinion expressed there and here is our own and does not reflect that of the station. A note about playlists and Listener Feedback.

 

Nina Totenberg on her Dad and his Strad: Amazing!

A Rarity Reclaimed: Stolen Stradivarius Recovered After 35 Years

by Nina TotenBerg

(Read it and see the wonderful photographs)

 

Nina Totenberg's Dad with the Strad

─N.M.

A Maddy-Shaped Hole in the Universe

 
meeraHow on earth do we process the death of a child? How will anything be better, ever? How will we laugh again? How is it possible that the sun still rises and people have birthdays and dogs still bark and the clothes need to be washed and food prepared and parades still happen?

We have lost a child. Indeed, we have lost two children. The brokenness of one led to the death of another. Waves upon waves — not ripples, but waves — of brokenness spreads like wildfire after a drought. We all look to answer why, we yearn to understand, we try to take our own selves out of the equation to make the loss make sense. We add variables. Try to identify constants. We rationalize the irrational and try to balance the equation that doesn’t result in such an imbalanced loss. What could we have done differently. Who is to blame. We heap the intensity of our emotion onto anyone we can point to, saying he did it. She did it. It’s his fault. They didn’t do it right. If only this hadn’t happened. If only I had been there. If only anyone could have seen. If only anyone knew. If only somehow. If only.

Blame doesn’t help. No matter how we try, there is no sense, no logic; there is no fault, there is no reason. Nothing works to ease the raw wound that we all now carry.

When faced with emotions that are so raw, so livid and infected, I have to turn to art. There are not enough words, not enough tears, not enough logic in the universe to make sense of something like this, so the only thing to do is let it wash over and through. Just as the heat of the last week has made dogs pant in the shade and more grass to shrivel and go into dormancy, I have to let the emotion drain me dry. Listen to music, read poetry, draw, paint, cook, garden. “All the perfumes of Arabia will not sweeten my hand”, but perfumes are cloying anyway, and emotion needs to color each expression.

Art has been dry, bitter, and prickly this week. I expect next week will be dark and empty, all in a minor key. After that, who knows. Stars will continue to make pinpricks in the velvet dark, scattering themselves across the Maddy-shaped hole in the universe.

And from this, maybe calm returns. Laughter will eventually come naturally, and the colors will reassert themselves in a field of wildflowers. We will remember.

–Meera

 

The poetry from tonight’s show are linked below in the playlist for tonight’s program, except for two by Ken Collier, which I read at the end of the program. The texts are below.

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More from the organ at Holy Cross Church, Santa Cruz

holy-cross-church

The Holy Cross Catholic Church, Santa Cruz California

 

Listen Live

Tune in at 88.9 FM

7:00-9:30 PM (Pacific Time)

or

stream on demand for a week after it airs

Playlist for July 23, 2015

Hosted tonight by Nicholas Mitchell

Two weeks ago I featured an excellent recording of the Felgemaker/Goodwin pipe organ at Holy Cross Church, Santa Cruz, in a performance of Alexei Parshin from the album “On a Mission from Russia”. Tonight we’ll hear his student, Vlada Volkova-Moran, play this local treasure of an instrument. On the night of  my radio show two weeks ago, I was not aware that she was going to be performing that Saturday at the Boomeria benefit concert, or I would have featured her performance and told you about the performance on Preston Boomer’s own wonderful pipe organ! Alas, I was not able to attend myself, put if you did, tell us about it! I’d love to what the experience was like.

Also on tonight’s show I’ll share more from my recent CD acquisitions as well as new arrivals to the KUSP library. Tweet your comments and requests to our new Twitter account: @mdsKUSP. It could use some traffic! (Unlike some of us frustrated drivers.)

Time

(approx)

Composer

Selection

Performers

Record
Title

Label

7:00

Gregorian

Antiphon:
Alleluia, lapis revolutus est
(Mode V)

The
Benedictine Monks

of Santo Domingo de Silos

Easter
Chant

Milan

 

Vidimus stellam
eius – Alleluia; Tribus miraculisMagnificat-Antiphon;
Hostis Herodes impie-Hymn; Videntes stellam Magi – Magnificat-Antiphon
Hodie nobis beata illuxit – Antiphon;
Antiphon & Psalm 71

Schola Cantorum
of Cologne;
Gabriel Maria Stenschulte, director

Chant IV: The Millenium

Angel

 

J.S. Bach

Vater unser im Himmelreich, BWV 636

Vlada Volkova-Moran, organ (The Felgemaker/Goodwin pipe organ at Holy Cross Church, Santa Cruz)

On a Mission from
Russia

a-ram

 

Gregorian

Epiphany Vigils: ResponsoryIlluminare”; Te
Deum;Gospel

The Trappist
Monks of the Abbey of Gethsemani, Kentucky

Behold! Three Wise Men Came out of the
East

Sony

7:30

J.S. Bach

Nun kommder Heiden
Heiland, BWV 552b

Alexei Parshin, organ (The Felgemaker/Goodwin pipe organ at Holy Cross Church, Santa Cruz)

On a Mission from
Russia

a-ram

 

Gregorian

Epiphany Lauds: Hymn “Illuminas Altissimus” with Versicle and Response; Benedictus
and Antiphon; Kyrie and Pater Noster; Prayer and
Concluding Versicles and Responses; Veterem “Hominem” Antiphons

The Trappist
Monks of the Abbey of Gethsemani, Kentucky

Behold! Three Wise Men Came out of the
East

Sony

 

J.S. Bach

Prelude,
Largo and
Fugue in C Major, BWV 545

Vlada Volkova-Moran, organ (The Felgemaker/Goodwin pipe organ at Holy Cross Church, Santa Cruz)

On a Mission from
Russia

a-ram

8:00

Giovanni Gabrieli

Quem vidistis
pastores?; Canzon IV a 6;
O Jesu mi dulcissime; Canzon per sonar a 4; Jubilate Deo;
In ecclesiis*; Timor
et tremor

Choir of King’s College,
Cambridge; Philip Jones Brass Ensemble; Stephen Cleobury,
conductor; Charles Brett, counter tenor; William
Kendall and Peter Hall, tenors; Ian Caddy, bass; *Thomas Elias treble

Giovanni Gabrieli: The Glory of Venice

Argo

8:45

Alessandro Scarlatti

Concerto
grosso No.4 in G Minor

Europa Galante; Fabio Biondi,
violin and direction

A&D
Scarlatti: Concerti & Sinfonie

Virgin Veritas

 

Domenico Scarlatti

Sinfonia in C Major

9:00

Alessandro Scarlatti

Concerto
grosso No.3 in F Major; Sonata (Concerto #9) in A
Minor

 

J.S. Bach

Contrapunctus 11

Angela Hewitt, piano

J.S. Bach: The Art of Fugue BWV 1080

Hyperion

─N.M.
Comments and requests welcome, follow us on Twitter: MeeraNicholas, and Musica della sera (new).  Call during the show at: 831.476.2800 (local) or toll-free
800.655.5877.  
We’re also on Facebook: MeeraNicholasand Musica della sera.
Opinion expressed there and here is our own and does not reflect that of the station. A note about playlists and Listener Feedback.

 

Tin Ear, by Peter Schmitt

Tin Ear

by Peter Schmitt

We stood at attention as she moved
with a kind of Groucho shuffle
down our line, her trained music
teacher’s ear passing by
our ten- and eleven-year-old mouths
open to some song now forgotten.
And as she held her momentary
pause in front of me, I peered
from the corner of my eye
to hers, and knew the truth
I had suspected.
In the following days,
as certain of our peers
disappeared at appointed hours
for the Chorus, something in me
was already closing shop.
Indeed, to this day
I still clam up
for the national anthem
in crowded stadiums, draw
disapproving alumni stares
as I smile the length of school songs,
and even hum and clap
through “Happy Birthday,” creating
a diversion—all lest I send
the collective pitch
careening headlong into dissonance.
It’s only in the choice acoustics
of shower and sealed car
that I can finally give voice
to that heart deep within me
that is pure, tonally perfect, music.
But when the water stops running
and the radio’s off, I can remember
that day in class,
when I knew for the first time
that mine would be a world of words
without melody, where refrain
means do not join,
where I’m ready to sing
in a key no one has ever heard.

poet peter schmitt

“Tin Ear” by Peter Schmitt from Country Airport. © Copper Beech Press, 1989. From The Writer’s Almanac, July 4, 2015

—N.M.