Musica della sera

Musica della sera is a classical music radio show
hosted alternate weeks by Meera Collier and Nicholas Mitchell
It airs Thursdays on KUSP Santa Cruz, 88.9 FM, 7:00-9:30pm (Pacific Time)

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or stream most recent show ↗

Complete Playlist Index (2003-present)

Pronounced ko-VAH-suh-vich

For Beethoven’s 24th piano sonata we present our 23rd pianist Stephen Kovacevich.  (Why not the 24th pianist? Ask me again and again! I love that question, ha ha.) Born in Los Angeles, Kovacevich is of Croation descent.  He studied piano in London with Dame Myra Hess.

Stephen Kovacevich

Stephen Kovacevich

Tonight, 7:00 – 9:30 pm (Pacific Time)

Listen Live

Playlist for July 24, 2014

*Click Here to hear the always scintillating András Schiff
talk about Beethoven’s Piano Sonata No. 24 in F-sharp major, Op. 78

 

─N.M.

Musica della sera is a classical music radio show broadcast Thursday nights, 7:00-9:30 pm (Pacific) on KUSP Santa Cruz, 88.9 FM. Listen Live or listen to the Most Recent Show.

Follow us on Twitter: Meera and Nicholas and on Facebook: Meera, Nicholas,
and Musica della sera. Opinion expressed there and here is our own and doesn’t
reflect that of the station. A note about playlists and Listener Feedback.

 

A Brief Exploration of the History of the Keyboard

NMM 13010. Grand piano (Pandaleon-Clavecin) by Frantz Jacob Spath, Regensburg, 1767

 

 

The first 90 minutes (more or less) of the program was an exploration of the evolution of the keyboard, beginning with Bach on the harpsichord. We also included Haydn’s Variations on “Gott erhalte Franz den Kaiser” and Variations on a theme of Chopin by Federico Mompou. I realize now that this could make a fun show — all themes and variations! I may have to put something like that together in the future.

I also played Chopin’s famous “Minute Waltz” — but there is speculation as to whether this is “minute” (MIN-it, as the time unit), or “minute” (my-NOOT, as in “small and insignificant”). Because this version is played in 1:27, I am leaning towards the latter!

The choral portion of the program featured composers of the 20 and 21st centuries, with music that just feels good to listen to — including a new release of choral music by Imogen Holst, the daughter of Gustav Holst. A new composer for me to explore!

–Meera

 

 

Playlist for Thursday, Thursday, July 17, 2014

Time

(approx)

Composer

Selection

Performers

Record Title

Label

7:00

Johann Sebastian Bach

(1685 – 1750)

Sonata, BWV 1030

Michala Petri,
recorder

Keith Jarrett, harpsichord

Bach
Sonatas

(1992)

RCA Victor

Franz Joseph Haydn

1732 – 1809)

Four Variations on “Gott erhalte Franz den Kaiser” in G,
authentic keyboard version after Hob. III” (1797)

Sylvia Berry, fortepiano

Haydn: London Sonatas

(2014)

Aeis

7:30

Ludwig Van Beethoven

(1770 – 1827)

Piano Sonata No. 23 in F minor,
op. 57 “Appassionata

I.                 Allegro assai

II.               Andante con moto

III.             Allegro ma non troppo

Vladimir Ashkenazy,
piano

Ashkenazy:
Favourite Beethoven

(1982)

London

7:55

Frédéric Chopin

(1810 – 1849)

Prelude
in D-Flat Major, Op. 28, No. 15 – “Raindrop”

Marjan Kiepura,
piano

Chopin:
Images of a Homeland

(2000)

Patria

8:00

Frédéric Chopin

         Waltz Op. 64 No. 1 in D flat major – “Minute”

         Waltz Op. 64 No. 2 in C sharp minor

Alexandre Tharaud,
piano

Chopin: Valses

(2006)

Harmonia Mundi

Federico Mompou

(1893 – 1987)

Variations
sur un thème de Chopin

Theme: Andantino

I.              Tranquillo

II.            Gracioso

III.          Lento

IV.          Espressivo

V.            Tempo di Mazurka

VI.          Recitativo

VII.        Allegro leggiero

VIII.      Andante dolce e espressivo

IX.          Valse

X.            Évocation

XI.          Lento dolce e legato

XII.        Galope y epíogo

Lento

Jonathan Plowright, piano

Hommage à Chopin

(2010)

Hyperion

8:30

Imogen Holst

(1907 – 1984)

Welcome Joy and Welcome Sorrow: Six settings of John Keats

I.          Welcome Joy and Welcome Sorrow

II.        Teignmouth

III.      Over the Hill and over the Dale

IV.       O Sorrow

V.          Lullaby

VI.        Shed no tear

Choir of Clare College, Cambridge,
Graham Ross, director

Tanya Houghton, harp

Imogen Holst:
Choral Works

(2012)

Harmonia Mundi

9:00

Frank LaRocca

Expectavi Dominum

Artists Vocal Ensemble, Jonathan Dimmock,
conductor

In
this Place

(2012)

Enharmonic Records

Eric Whitacre

(b. 1970)

Five Hebrew Love Songs

Brigham Young University Choir, Rosalind Hall, conductor

Beautiful River: Songs of Refuge, Love, and Devotion

(2005)

Tantara Records

9:05

George Butterworth

(1885 – 1916)

Six
Songs from “A Shropshire
Lad”

         Loveliest of trees

         When I was one-and-twenty

         Look not in my eyes

         Think no more, lad

         The Lads in their hundreds

         Is my team ploughing?

Bryn Terfel, baritone; Malcolm
Martineau, piano

The
Vagabond

(1995)

Deutsche Grammophon

 

Stephen Sondheim

(b. 1930)

From Sweeney Todd
(arr. Silberschlag)

Johanna

 

Jeffrey Silberschlag, trumpet

Seattle Symphony, Gerard Schwarz, director

The American Trumpet

(2012)

Naxos

Musica
della sera Playlist Archive

Artur Schnabel

Next in our continuing presentation of the complete set of Beethoven piano sonatas we feature Sonata No. 22, in F Major, Op. 54*, performed by Artur Schnabel. An early recording artist, Schnabel was the first pianist ever to record all 32 of Beethoven’s piano sonatas.

Schnabel

Artur Schnabel (1882–1951)

Tonight, 7:00 – 9:30 pm (Pacific Time)

Playlist for July 10, 2014

Schnabel first performed the complete cycle of 32 sonatas in Berlin in 1927 for the centenary of Beethoven’s death. He did the entire series again twice, in Berlin, and then in London between 1932 and 1934, and it was during this period that he made recordings of the complete set. He approached performance with an emphasis on artistic expression over technique, that audiences seemed to find refreshing.

schnabel records

Artur Schnabel getting ready for a piano roll recording on a sophisticated Philipps Duca device. (1919)

Born to a Jewish family in Lipnik, near Bielitz, Galicia, which is now part of Poland, he moved with his family to Vienna in 1884 when he was just 2.

As a boy, Schnabel was introduced to Johannes Brahms and his circle by his music theory teacher Eusebius Mandyczewski, who was also an assistant to Brahms. When Schnabel heard Brahms play the first piano quartet he remarked that the great master missed a lot of notes, but played in a “true grand manner”.

Brahms Older

Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)

Schnabel moved to Berlin in 1898 where he performed and gave piano lessons. He formed and reformed the Schnabel Piano Trio with different violinists and cellists over the years . After World War I he toured the United States, Russia, and England.

When the Nazi Party took power in 1933 Schnabel left Germany and eventually settled in the United States. In 1942 his mother was taken to the Theresienstadt concentration camp (in what is now the Czech Republic) where she perished after two months. Schnabel never returned to Germany or Austria after the war and became a naturalized U.S. citizen in 1944.

Schnabel was a champion of the piano sonatas of Schubert, which, until then, were rarely performed. He completed his recording of the complete set of Beethoven sonatas in 1935.  Just as Schnabel commented on Brahms’ fumbling performance, Rachmaninoff called Schnabel “the great adagio pianist”, presumably slighting his abilities in the faster passages. It has been said that Schnabel was very nervous in front of recording equipment.  On the other hand, pianist Claudio Arrau, said he played flawlessly in live performances.

Among those he played with were violinist/composer Paul Hindemith, cellists Pablo Casals & Pierre Fournier, and the top conductors of his day, including Wilhelm Furtwängler, Bruno Walter, Otto Klemperer, George Szell, and Sir Adrian Boult.

Schnabel-String Quartet Video

Artur Schnabel, the composer: String Quartet No. 4 – i Molto moderato

Artur Schnabel was also a serious composer. Though his performance repertoire focused on works in the tradition of Mozart, Beethoven, Chopin, and Brahms, almost all of his own compositions are atonal, taking the lead from his close friend and fellow exile from Austria, Arnold Schoenberg. Though his compositions were largely ignored in the 20th century, recent years have seen new recordings of Schnabel’s music (e.g., 3 string quartets and 3 symphonies, various piano works), thanks largely to the championing of violinist Paul Zukovsky.

Schnabel-String Trio Video

Artur Schnabel – String Trio (1925) performed by the Galimir Trio.

His son Stefan was an actor who portrayed Dr. Stephen Jackson for sixteen years on the CBS television soap opera The Guiding Light.

*Click Here to hear an audio clip of pianist András Schiff
defending Beethoven’s 22nd piano sonata,
which he concedes may be the least popular of the 32.

 

Time
(approx)
Composer Selection Performers Record Title Label

 

Loyset Compère Dictes moy toutes vos pensées The Tallis Scholars; Peter Phillips, conductor Jean Mouton: Missa Dictes moy toutes vos pensés Gimell
7:00 Jean Mouton Nesciens mater

 

Giuseppe Tartini Sonata No. 10 in B Major; Sonata No. 12 in G Major Giovanni Guglielmo, violin; Antonio Pocaterra, violoncello Giuseppe Tartini: 12 Sonatas for Violin and Violoncello Das Alte Werk
7:30 J.S. Bach Cantata: Ein feste Burg ist unser Gott, BWV 80 American Bach Soloists; American Bach Choir; Jeffrey Thomas, conductor and tenor; Catherine Gott, soprano; Daniel Taylor, countertenor; William Sharp, baritone J. S. Bach: Favorite Cantatas Americanbach.org
8:00 Heinrich Ignaz Franz Biber Sonata St. Polycarpi à 9 Concentus musicus of Vienna; Nikolaus Harnoncourt, conductor Biber: St. Polycarp Sonata – Laetatus – Epiphany Cantata – Requiem Das Alte Werk (LP)
  Sonata à 7 in C Major The New Trumpet Ensemble; Gerard Schwarz, conductor and trumpet A Festival of Trumpets Nonesuch (LP)
  Johan Christoph Pezel Sonatina No. 61 and No. 65
  Anonymous Cuatro Piezas de Clarines in D Major for Trumpet and Organ Edward Tarr, natural trumpet; Irmtraud Krüger, organ Spanish Golden Age Music for Trumpet & Organ Nonesuch (LP)
  Samuel Scheidt Canzona for 4 Trumpets The New Trumpet Ensemble; Gerard Schwarz, conductor and trumpet A Festival of Trumpets Nonesuch (LP)
  Antonio Soler Minué for Trumpet and Organ Edward Tarr, natural trumpet; Irmtraud Krüger, organ Spanish Golden Age Music for Trumpet & Organ Nonesuch (LP)
8:30 Joseph Haydn Notturno in C Major, Hob. II:25 Consortium Classicum; Karl Hochreither and Frieder Lang, positive organs; Dieter Klöcker, conductor and clarinet Joseph Haydn: 6 Notturni cpo
9:00 Ludwig van Beethoven Piano Sonata No. 22 in F Major, Op. 54; Piano Sonata No. 20 in G Major, Op. 49, No. 2 Artur Schnabel, piano Beethoven: The Complete Piano Sonatas EMI
  John Cage Sonatas & Interludes for Prepared Piano: Sonatas Nos. 1-4; Interlude No. 1; Sonata No. 5 John Tilbury, prepared piano John Cage: Sonatas & Interludes for Prepared Piano Decca

─N.M.

Musica della sera is a classical music radio show broadcast Thursday nights, 7:00-9:30 pm (Pacific) on KUSP Santa Cruz, 88.9 FM. Listen Live or listen to the Most Recent Show.

Follow us on Twitter: Meera and Nicholas and on Facebook: Meera, Nicholas,
and Musica della sera. Opinion expressed there and here is our own and doesn’t
reflect that of the station. A note about playlists and Listener Feedback.

Summer Americana!

American Choral Music, a collaboration of the the Library of Congress and the American Choral Directors Association, provides access to significant choral music in the public domain by the leading American composers of the time.

American Choral Music, a collaboration of the the Library of Congress and the American Choral Directors Association, provides access to significant choral music in the public domain by the leading American composers of the time.

Listen Live

 Playlist for July 3, 2014

Happy Fourth of July, a day early! It’s Meera’s annual expression of patriotism. And it won’t be all marching bands and National Anthems. Expect some Charles Ives, spirituals, and Shaker tunes.

Tonight! 7:00 to 9:30, Pacific time. Enjoy!

 

–Meera

for June 26, 2014

Young Shostakovich

Dmitri Shostakovich

This show comes with salutations to my late father James Mitchell and to my oldest brother Eric. I was thinking of them because the show fell between their respective birthdays.

I kept meaning to mention this on the air, but just kept forgetting.  In fact, discombobulation dogged me throughout the whole show as a result of a mishap of absent-mindedness and bad timing that got me off to a bad start.  I’d love to share the story, with all the tedious detail, if only to ease some of the feelings of defeat and desolation from the experience, but I won’t do that. I’ll just say that I did that thing DJ’s tend to have recurring bad dreams about: I locked myself out of the station during the show, and nobody was there to let me in.

Thanks to the assistance, by phone, from my son Gabriel, and then Meera, I was back at the microphone after tracking just six short Scarlatti keyboard sonatas.  Things could have gone much, much worse had good fortune not canceled out the bad.  At least the listeners were spared dead air.

On to the music…

Continuing our series on the complete Beethoven piano sonatas, the celebrated Waldstein, performed by Hiroko Nakamura, winner of the 7th International Frederick Chopin Piano Competition.  If you’re interested in learning more at this piece, I recommend András Schiff’s comprehensive lecture series on the Beethoven sonatas.

Click Here to hear an audio clip of pianist András Schiff
discussing Beethoven’s Waldstein Sonata.

 

It looks like we’re on track, I’m happy to say, to feature a different pianist for each of the 32 sonatas, with the one exception of the Op. 49, Nos. 1 and 2 (Nos. 19 and 20), both performed by Ronald Brautigam.

Also on the program, a Haydn sonata performed by Sylvia Berry on a restored 1806 Broadwood fortepiano.  A couple of weeks ago Meera posted a blog entry about Sylvia, a college school chum, and her new Haydn album: Fantastic Interview with a Fantastic Pianist

And a new recording of Shostakovich’s Opus 40, the gorgeous Sonata for Cello and Piano in D Minor, performed by Emmanuelle Bertrand, cello and Pascal Amoyel, piano.

Listen the the show while ye may, it’s available to stream on demand until next Thursday’s show.  Just click the play gadget on this page under where it says “Listen to Recent Show”.

─Nicholas Mitchell

locked out

 

Time
(approx)

Composer

Selection

Performers

Record Title

Label

7:00

Domenico Scarlatti

Keyboard Sonatas: in A Minor, K. 54; in F Major, K. 525, in F Minor, K. 466; in G Major, K. 146; in D Major,K. 96; im E Major, K.162

Vladimir Horowitz, piano

Horowitz: The Celebrated Scarlatti Recordings

Sony

7:30

Franz Joseph Haydn

Piano Sonata in C Major, Hob. XVI: 50

Sylvia Berry, fortepiano

Haydn: London Sonatas

Acis

 

Ludwig van Beethoven

Piano Sonata No. 21 in C Major, Op. 53 “Waldstein”

Hiroko Nakamura, piano

Beethoven: Diabelli Variations

Sony

8:15

Franz Schubert

Songs: Meeres Stille; An die Musik; An Silvia; Die Forelle; Auf der Bruck; Lachen und Weinen; Das Fischermädchen

Bryn Terfel, baritone; Malcom Martineau, piano

An di Musik

Deutsche Grammophon

8:30

Dmitri Shostakovich

Sonata for Cello and Piano in D Minor, Op. 40

Emmanuelle Bertrand, cello; Pascal Amoyel, piano

Shostakovich: Cello Concerto and Cello Sonata

Harmonia Mundi

9:00

Stefan Wolpe

Passacaglia

Garrick Ohlsson, piano

Close Connections

Bridge

 

Samuel Barber

Easter Chorale

Conspirare; Craig Hella Johnson & Company of Voices

Samuel Barber: An American Romantic

Harmonia Mundi

 Musica della sera Playlist Archive

Musica della sera is a classical music radio show broadcast Thursday nights, 7:00-9:30 pm (Pacific) on KUSP Santa Cruz, 88.9 FM. Listen Live or listen to the Most Recent Show.

Follow us on Twitter: Meera and Nicholas and on Facebook: Meera, Nicholas,
and Musica della sera. Opinion expressed there and here is our own and doesn’t
reflect that of the station. A note about playlists and Listener Feedback.

Beethoven on Antidepressants

Beethoven on AntidepressantsHis 5th symphony turned out not to be so groundbreaking, either.

 

Just kidding, though! Tonight we’ll be featuring Beethoven’s 19th and 20th sonatas (Op. 49, Nos. 1 and 2), both short ones but big favorites of mine. Tonight’s pianist is Ronald Brautigam, performing on the fortepiano.

The Op. 49 sonatas were “surely written for home performance by an amateur… These pieces could possibly have been attributed to a more old-fashioned, more craftsman-like contemporary of Beethoven’s. The ambition level of this music is not high, and the sonatas have an obvious tailor-made technical facility. It is not known for whom these charming, Mozartian pieces were intended.” –Roeland Hazendonk, 2005

That said, the Op. 49 No. 2 is a dear favorite of mine, as I worked countless hours playing it when I was a teenager. I just pulled it out a couple of weeks ago and ran through it… and it’s still tattooed in the muscle memory of my fingers. Faded, perhaps. Well, a lot. But it’s still there.

–Meera

Time
(approx)

Composer

Selection

Performers

Record Title

Label

7:00

Claudio Monteverdi
(1567 – 1643)

       Ed è pur dunque vero

       Parlo misero, o taccio?

Martin Klietmann, tenor; Mária Zádori, Márta Fers, sopranos; Kalus Mertens, baritone

Capella Savaria, Nicholas McGegan, conductor

Monteverdi: Tirsi e Clori, Matrigaux
(1991)

Harmonia Mundi

7:15

Sigismondo D’India
(1582 – 1629)

       Cara mia cetra

       Intenerite voi, lagrime mie

       Mentre che’l cor

Maria Cristina Kiehr, soprano

Concerto Soave, Jean-Marc Aymes, director

Madrigali e Canzonette
(2003)

Harmonia Mundi

 

Giovanni Girolamo Kapsberger
(c.1580 – 1651)

Ciaccona

Paula Chateauneuf, citarrone

The Age of Extravagance: Virtuoso Music from Iberia and Italy
(1998)

Hyperion

7:30

Giovanni Battista Fontana
(d. 1630)

Sonata sesta

Jeremy West, cornett; Timothy Roberts, organ; Paula Chateauneuf, citarrone; Frances Kelly, double harp

 

Claudio Merulo
(1533 – 1604)

Toccata quarta del secondo tono

Timothy Roberts, organ

 

Giovanni Bassano
(c. 1558) – 1617)

Divisions on Susanna un jour

Jeremy West, cornett; Frances Kelly, double harp

 

Marco Marazzoli
(1602 – 1662)

Salutate il nuovo Aprile

Arianna Savall, soprano; Ricercar Concert, Philippe Pierlot, director

Sopra la rosa
(2002)

Alia Vox

7:50

Johann Christoph Friedrich Bach
(1732 – 1795)

Wachet auf

  1. Zion hört die Wächter singen
  2. Gloria sei dir gesungen
  3. Chorale: Gloria sei dir gesungen

The Choir of Trinity College, Cambridge; Andrew Lamb, organ; Richard Marlow, director

Bach Family Motets
(1997)

BMG

8:10

Monsieur de Sainte Colombe le Fils
(c. 1660 – 1720?)

Suite in Fa Majeur

  1. Prelude
  2. Allemande
  3. Courante
  4. Sarabande
  5. Gigue
  6. Gavotte
  7. Boree
  8. Minuet

Jordi Savall, bass viol

Mr. de Sainte Colombe le Fils: Pieces de viole

Alia Vox

8:30

Ludwig van Beethoven
(1770 – 1827)

Sonata No. 19 in G minor, Op. 49 No. 1 (1797?)

I.           Andante

II.         Rondo. Allegro

Sonata No. 20 in G Major, Op. 49 No. 2 (1795)

I.           Allegro, ma non troppo

II.         Tempo di Menuetto

Ronald Brautigam, fortepiano

Fortepiano by Paul McNulty, 2001, after Walther & Sohn, c. 1802

Beethoven: Early Vienna Sonatas
(2005)

BIS Records

8:50

Rebecca Clarke
(1886 – 1979)

Sonata for viola and piano (1919)

I.           Impetuoso

II.         Vivace

III.       Adagio – agitato

Garfield Jackson, viola; Martin Roscoe, piano

Amy Beach: Piano Quintet
(1995)

ASV Digital

9:10

Maurice Ravel
(1875 – 1937)

Piece in the form of a Habanera

Bill Booth, trombone; Bryan Pezzone, piano

Balancing Act
(2000)

Crystal Records

9:15

Ernesto Lecuona

Yo te quiero siempre (I will always love you)

Ari Shapiro, vocals; Nicholas Crosa, violin; Pink Martini, conducted by Thomas Lauderdale, piano

Pink Martini: Get Happy
(2014)

Heinz Records

 

Traditional

Până când nu te iubeam (Before I fell in love with you)

Storm Large, vocals; Pink Martini, conducted by Thomas Lauderdale, piano

 

Irving Berlin

What’ll I do?

China Forbes, vocals; Norman Leyden, clarinet; Pink Martini, conducted by Thomas Lauderdale, piano

Medieval, Neo-Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque, and Wilhelm Kempff plays Beethoven

Musica della sera

Thursdays on KUSP, 7:00-9:30pm (PT)

Hosted this week by Nicholas Mitchell

Listen Live

This week I did a little excavating of my much neglected LP collection and found a couple favorite gems from my pre-historic days as a classical DJ. These recordings have a very special place in my heart. Albert Schweitzer playing Bach on an organ in Alsace, and an early release on the Musical Heritage Society label of Gesualdo madrigals. To hear them again after decades was, well, music to my ears. I hope you, too, will appreciate the unique charm of these historic recordings.

N.B., contrary to what I said on the air, Beethoven’s 18th piano sonata does indeed have a subtitle!  Of course, it’s The Hunt! Galloping can definitely be heard in the music.

 

Playlist for June 12, 2014

Time
(approx)

Composer

Selection

Performers

Record Title

Label

7:00

Alfonso X “El Sabio”

Nul ome per ren; Nas mentes sempre teer; Nenbressete madre de Deus; Maravillosos e piadosos; Quen a omagen da Virgen

Alla Francesca

Cantigas

Opus 111

 

Carlo Gesualdo da Venosa

The First Book of Madrigals: 1. a) Baci soavi e cari; b) Quanto ha di dolce Amore; 2. Madonna, io ben vorrei; 3. Com’esser puo; 4. Gelo ha Madonna il seno; 5. a) Mentre Madonna; b) Ahi! Troppo saggia

Karla Schlean, soprano; Clara Foti, mezo-soprano; Elena Mazzoni, contralto; Rodolfo Farolfi, tenor; Gastone Sarti, baritone; Dmitri Nabokov, bass; Angelo Ephrikian, conductor

Gesualdo: The First Three Books of Madrigals

Musical Heritage Society (LP)

7:30

Sungji Hong

Missa Lumen de Lumine for Three Voices (Dedicated to Trio Mediaeval)

Trio Mediaeval: Anna Maria Friman; Linn Andrea Fuglseth; Torunn Østrem Ossum

Stella Maris

ECM

8:00

J.S. Bach

Prelude in C Major, BWV 531; Canzona in D Minor, BWV 588; Chorale Prelude: “Ich ruf’ zu dir, Herr Jesu Christ” (Lord, hear the voice of my complaint.)

Albert Schweitzer, organ (Parish Church, Gunsbach, Alsace)

Schweitzer Plays Bach Organ Works

Odyssey (LP)

 

Carlo Gesualdo da Venosa

The First Book of Madrigals: 6. Se da si nobil mano; 7. Amor, pace non chero; 8. Si gioioso mi fanno

Karla Schlean, soprano; Clara Foti, mezo-soprano; Elena Mazzoni, contralto; Rodolfo Farolfi, tenor; Gastone Sarti, baritone; Dmitri Nabokov, bass; Angelo Ephrikian, conductor

Gesualdo: The First Three Books of Madrigals

Musical Heritage Society (LP)

8:30

Anonymous

O Maria, stella maris* Dou way Robyn/Sancta Mater; Beata Viscera

Trio Mediaeval: Anna Maria Friman; Linn Andrea Fuglseth; Torunn Østrem Ossum; *w/John Potter

 

Stella Maris

ECM

 

Jean-Marie Leclair

Sonata in G Major for Two Violins, Op. 3, No. 1

Greg Ewer and Adam Lamotte, violins

Jean-Marie LeClair: The Complete Sonatas for Two Violins

Sono Luminus

9:00

W.A. Mozart/J.S. Bach

Adagio cantabile & Fugue in E-Flat Major, after J.S. Bach, BWV 876 (WTC II)

Akademie fur Alte Musik Berlin

W.A. Mozart: Adagios & Fugues

Harmonia Mundi

 

Ludwig van Beethoven

Piano Sonata No.18 in E-Flat Major, Op.31, No. 3, “The Hunt”.

Wilhelm Kempff, piano

Beethoven: The 32 Piano Sonatas

Deutsche Grammophon

(Playlist Index)

 

Wilhelm Kempff

Wilhelm Kempff

Musica della sera is a classical music radio show broadcast Thursday nights, 7:00-9:30 pm (Pacific) on KUSP Santa Cruz, 88.9 FM. Listen Live or listen to the Most Recent Show.
Follow us on Twitter: Meera and Nicholas and on Facebook: Meera, Nicholas,
and Musica della sera. Opinion expressed there and here is our own and doesn’t
reflect that of the station. A note about playlists and Listener Feedback.

─NM

Fantastic Interview with a Fantastic Pianist

Haydn London Sonatas

I went to middle school with Sylvia Berry in Philadelphia, and I remember her coming over to my house for my 14th birthday (I think), and her playing Bach’s 8th Two-Part Invention, and we had a long conversation about phrasing in the piece.

The other people who came to the party kind of looked at each other and blinked.

But now she’s a very successful musician in Boston, and has recently released this CD. In addition, this interview with her posted in Fanfare Magazine is hugely interesting! Check it out by clicking the image above.

From the article:

The American pianist Sylvia Berry has made a specialty of period instrument performance (she has a master’s degree in historical keyboard instruments from Oberlin), and here uses an especially appropriate fortepiano for this music, an 1806 Broadwood, a product of the famous London builder who also made the last piano played by Beethoven. Haydn was a guest of John Broadwood during his London visit, and knew his instruments well. Berry revels in the fabulous tonal range of this superbly restored instrument (care of Dale Munschy, of Massachusetts), drawing out woody, pastel colors, as well as a somewhat nasal overall character that is noticeably different in dramatic impact than the more open sound of a modern piano. Not to beat a dead horse, but it is worth repeating that this must have been, essentially, the sound that the composer had in his mind when creating this music. Berry plays this music with a completely engrossing sense of wonderment and technical aplomb. She is especially captivating in the faster, outer movements, where she presents the great joy and humor of Haydn at a truly exalted level. In short, this is a completely delightful release; great music, excellent recording and production values, and a vivacious and even revelatory period instrument performance.

–Meera

Music in the time of Commemoration

Men in uniform file out of La Madeleine à Sainte Marie du Mont, in Manche, close to the beaches of Normandy where the D-Day invasion took place

Men in uniform file out of La Madeleine à Sainte Marie du Mont, in Manche, close to the beaches of Normandy where the D-Day invasion took place

 

 

 

Musica della sera

Classical Music 7:00-9:30pm, Pacific Time

Playlist for Thursday, June 05, 2014

Hosted by Meera Collier

 

Time
(approx)
Composer Selection Performers Record Title Label
7:00 Hector Berlioz
(1803 – 1869)
Au cimetière (clair de lune) – In the Cemetery (Moonlight) Brigette Balleys, mezzo-soprano

Orchestre des Champs Elysées, Philippe Herreweghe, director

Hector Berlioz: Nuits d’été, Op. 7
(1995)
Harmonia Mundi
  Francis Poulenc
(1899 – 1963)
Quatre motets pour un temps de pénitence (Four motets in a time of penitence)

  1. Timor et tremor
  2. Vinca mea electa
  3. Tenebrae factae sunt
  4. Tristis est anima mea
Polyphony, Stephen Layton, conductor Poulenc: Gloria & Motets
(2007)
Hyperion
7:30 Krysztof Penderecki
(b. 1933)
Agnus Dei The Concordia Choir, René Clausen, conductor In the New Moon
(1998)
Concordia Recordings
  Arnold Schoenberg
(1874 – 1951)
Friede auf Erden (Peace on Earth), Op. 13 (1907)

Text & Translation

Simon Joly Chorale, Robert Craft, director Schoenberg: Six Songs for Soprano and Orchestra, etc.
(2007)
Naxos
7:45 Peter Tchaikovsky
(1840 – 1893)
▪          Reconciliation, Op. 25 No. 1

▪          Sleep, poor friend, Op. 47 No. 4

▪          Dusk fell on the earth, Op. 47 No. 3

Sergei Leiferkus, baritone; Semion Skigin, piano The Complete Tchaikovsky Songs, Vol. I
(1996)
Conifer Classics
8:00 Johannes Brahms
(1833 – 1897)
Three Motets, Op. 110 (1889)

  1. Ich aber bin elend (Yet I am wretched)
  2. Ach arme Welt (O poor world)
  3. Wenn wir in höchsten Nöten sein (When we are in deepest troubles)
Saint Clements Choir, Philadelphia; Peter Richard Conte, director The Romantic Mass
(1995)
Dorian
  Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart*
(1756 – 1791)
Prelude & Fugue in D minor K405/4

After J.S. Bach, BWV 877 (The Well-Tempered Clavier, Book II)

Akademie für Alte Musik, Berlin Adagios & Fugues: W.A. Mozart after J.S. Bach
(2014)
Harmonia Mundi
8:15 Ludwig van Beethoven
(1770 – 1827)
Sonate No. 17 d-moll Op. 31 No. 2 “Sturm-Sonate” (In D Minor “The Tempest”)

  1. Largo
  2. Adagio
  3. Allegretto
Daniel Barenboim, piano Beethoven: Complete Piano Sonatas, Vol. 2
(1989)
EMI Clssics
8:40 Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart* Adagio & Fugue in D minor

After J.S. Bach, BWV 849 (The Well-Tempered Clavier, Book I)

Akademie für Alte Musik, Berlin Adagios & Fugues: W.A. Mozart after J.S. Bach
(2014)
Harmonia Mundi
  Peter Tchaikovsky Sonata No. 1 in F minor (1863/4)

Completed by Leslie Howard

Leslie Howard, piano Tchaikovsky: The Three Piano Sonatas
(1993)
Hyperion
9:00 Mark O’Connor ▪          Improvisation #1

▪          Caprice No. 2 in G Minor

Mark O’Connor, violin Midnight on the Water
(1998)
Sony Classical
  Gioacchino Rossini
(1792 – 1868)
Six Arias from The Barber of Seville (1816)

Arranged for Two Bassoons by François René Gebauer (1777 – 1823)

  1. Ecco ridente in cielo
  2. Largo al factotum
  3. Una Voce poco fa
  4. Dunque io son
  5. Zitti, ziti, piano piano
  6. Di si felice innesto
Stefano Canuti, Sergio Azzolini, bassoons International Double Reed Society – 25th Anniversary
(1997)
Crystal Records, Inc.

Musica della sera Playlist Archive

* From a review by James Manheim: “Titled Mozart: Adagios & Fugues (after Bach), this release by the venerable Akademie für alte Musik Berlin might more accurately be described as Arrangements after W.A. Mozart after J.S. Bach. The contents of the program are something of a mishmash, containing actual Mozart works in Bach’s style; Mozart arrangements of Bach for string quartet, here slightly rescored for no very good reason; slow movements added to Mozart’s arrangements taken from a manuscript of Mozart’s time but apparently not by Mozart; and entirely new Bach arrangements in the Mozartian vein that have nothing to do with Mozart at all…”